UVa CHARGE Program
   
  U.Va. CHARGE

U.Va. CHARGE Resources & Research

The following references are research studies and resources regarding the underrepresentation of women in STEM and SBE fields.

From NSF/National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES)

Thirty-Three Years of Women in S&E Faculty Positions - http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/infbrief/nsf08308/

From U.Va. NSF ADVANCE Proposal

Barker, L., Cohoon, J.M., and Sanders, L. 2010. Strategy Trumps Money: Recruiting Undergraduate Women into Computing. Computer 43, 82-85.

Barker, L.J., Cohoon, J.M., and Thompson, L.D.  2010. Work in progress — A practical model for achieving gender parity in undergraduate computing: Change the system, not the student. 2010 IEEE
Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), IEEE, S1H-1-S1H-2.

Bilmoria, D. M.H. Hopkins, D.A. O’Neil and S.R. Perry. 2007. Executive coaching: An effective strategy for faculty development. In Transforming science and engineering: Advancing academic women, edited by A.J. Stewart, J.E. Malley and D. LaVaque-Manty, 187-203. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Bullinger, A.C., A-K Neyer, M. Rass and K.M. Moeslein. 2010. Community-based innovation contests: Where competition meets cooperation. Creativity and Innovation Management 19(3): 290-302.

COACHE. 2010a. The Experience of tenure-track faculty at research universities: Analysis of COACHE survey results by academic area and gender. Cambridge, MA: The Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education.

COACHE. 2010b. COACHE results, University of Virginia. Cambridge, MA: The Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education.

Cohoon, J.M., Thompson, L.D., Goodall, J.J., Dohrman, R.L., and Litzler, E. 2010. Consultants on systemic reform for gender balance. Proceedings of the 41st ACM technical symposium on Computer Science Education, ACM , 554–555.

Davidson, M.N. 1999. The value of being included: An examination of diversity change initiatives in organizations. Performance Improvement Quarterly 12(1): 164-180.

______. 2011. The end of diversity as we know it: Why diversity efforts fail and how leveraging difference can succeed. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

Fox, Mary Frank. 2010. Women and men faculty in academic science and engineering: Social-organizational indicators and implications. American Behavioral Scientist 53(7): 997-1012. 

Fraser, G.J and D.E. Hunt. 2011. “Faculty Diversity and Search Committee Training: Learning From a Critical Incident.” Journal of Diversity in Higher Education 4(3): 185–198.

Frehill, L.M., C. Jeser-Cannavale and J.E. Malley. 2007. Measuring outcomes: Intermediate indicators of institutional transformation. In Transforming science and engineering: Advancing academic women, edited by A.J. Stewart, J.E. Malley and D. LaVaque-Manty, 298-323. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Heifitz. R.A. and D.L Laurie. 1997. The work of leadership. Harvard Business Review 75(1): 124-134.

Hurtado, S., J. Milem, A. Clayton-Pederson and W. Allen. (1999). Enacting diverse learning environments: Improving the climate for racial/ethnic diversity in higher education. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report 26(8). Washington, DC: The George Washington University, Graduate School of Education and Human Development.

Jordan, C.G. and D. Bilmoria. 2007. Creating a productive and inclusive academic work environment. In Transforming science and engineering: Advancing academic women, edited by A.J. Stewart, J.E. Malley and D. LaVaque-Manty, 225-242. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Journal of Blacks in Higher Education. 2011. Explaining the high black student graduation rate at the University of Virginia. JBHE Weekly Bulletin. March 3, 2011. http://www.jbhe.com/latest/index030311.html

Kezar, A.J. 2001. Understanding and facilitating organizational change in the 21st century. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Laursen, S.l. and B. Rocque. 2009. Faculty development for institutional change: Lessons from an ADVANCE project. Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning 41(2): 18-26.
Mannix, E. and E.A. Neale. 2005. What differences make a difference? The promise and reality of diverse teams in organizations. Psychological Science in the Public Interest 6(2): 31-55.  

Meyerson, D.E. and J.K. Fletcher. 2003. A modest manifesto for shattering the glass ceiling. In Reader in gender, work, and organization, edited by R.J. Ely, E.G Foldy, M.A. Scully, and the Center for Gender in Organizations, Simmons School of Management, 230-241. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

Milem, J., M. Chang and A. Antonio. 2005. Making diversity work on campus: A research-based perspective. Washington DC: Association of American Colleges & Universities.

Nelson, D.J. 2007. A National Analysis of Minorities in Science and Engineering Faculties at Research Universities, Norman, OK. http://chem.ou.edu/~djn/diversity/Faculty_Tables_FY07/07Report.pdf

Page, S.E. 2007. The difference: How the power of diversity creates better groups, firms, schools, and societies. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

PBS. Race: The power of an illusion. http://www.pbs.org/race/000_General/000_00-Home.htm

Rosser, S.V. and J.-L.A. Chameau. 2007. Institutionalization, sustainability, and repeatability of ADVANCE for institutional transformation. In Transforming science and engineering: Advancing academic women, edited by A.J. Stewart, J.E. Malley and D. LaVaque-Manty, 281-297. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Sheridan, J., P.F. Brennan, M. Carnes and J. Handelsman. 2006. Discovering directions for change in higher education through the experiences of senior women faculty. Journal of Technology Transfer 31:387-396.

Singh, P and M. Minsky. 2005. An architecture for cognitive diversity. In Visions of Mind, edited by D.N. Davis, 312-331. Hershey, PA: Information Science Publishing

Stewart, A.J., J.E. Malley, D. LaVaque-Manty. 2007. Analyzing the problem of women in science and engineering: Why do we need institutional transformation? In Transforming science and engineering: Advancing academic women, edited by A.J. Stewart, J.E. Malley and D. LaVaque-Manty, 3-20. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Sturm, S. 2007. Gender equity as institutional transformation: The pivotal role of “organizational catalysts.” In Transforming science and engineering: Advancing academic women, edited by A.J. Stewart, J.E. Malley and D. LaVaque-Manty, 262-280. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Terwiesch, C. and K.T. Ulrich. 2009. Innovation tournaments: Creating and selecting exceptional opportunities. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.

U.S News and World Report. 2011a. National university rankings. US News and World Report online. http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/rankings/national-universities

U.S. News and World Report. 2011b. Top public schools. US News and World Report. September 13, 2011.  http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/rankings/national-universities/top-public 

UVa Faculty Senate. 2007. Report on the Faculty Senate survey. Faculty Recruitment, Retention, Retirement, & Welfare Committee, University of Virginia. http://www.virginia.edu/facultysenate/documents/Faculty%20Senate%20Survey%20Final%20Report.pdf

Winslow, S. 2010. Gender inequality and time allocations among academic faculty. Gender and Society 24:769-793.

From NSF Advance RFP

Background section: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12584/nsf12584.htm

From WISELI

Women in Science & Engineering Leadership Institute - http://wiseli.engr.wisc.edu/subject.php

Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, “Promoting Institutional Change Through Bias Literacy

From The National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine of the National Academies

Committee on Maximizing the Potential of Women in Academic Science and Engineering, National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine. "Summary." Beyond Bias and Barriers: Fulfilling the Potential of Women in Academic Science and Engineering. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2007.

 

 

 


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